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Herbert Fleury

A black and white photograph of a smiling man with a moustache, glasses, and a homburg hat.

W.J. Fleury

William James Fleury, “Billie” or “Will” to his friends and family, was born on March 13, 1865 in Aurora, the youngest child of Joseph’s first wife, Sarah. He was only nine when his mother died and fifteen when his father died. As Joseph provided in his will, William inherited the ownership of the Fleury Agricultural Works when he reached the age of majority in 1886, as a full partner with his older brother, Herbert.
While Herbert was being groomed to succeed his father at the Fleury Works, William drew on the resources of the Works in another way. By his mid-teens he had already developed considerable skills with pen and brush, shown a talent for cabinetry, leather repoussé, wood carving and copper and brass etching – skills he may have learned from artisans employed by his father’s company.
In 1885, William served as a Lieutenant for six months during the Riel Rebellion. After the Rebellion, he returned to his real love, and the other source of his early reputation, cricket. The Aurora Sports Hall of Fame is inducting William this fall in recognition of his outstanding cricket skills and contribution to the game in Aurora and representing Canada abroad.
A small octagonal table with studs around the top and down the legs.
Table crafted by William, Image Courtesy of Bill Fleury
A painting of dogs being released on a fox hunt.
Painted by William Fleury, 1897
A black and white photograph of a woman with a black feather in her hat standing against a textured wall.
Margaret Buck, 1894
In 1902, William married Margaret Buck in Toronto and two years later, he built a house in the fashionable Annex area where his daughter, Elinor (1907), and son, William Eric (1910), were born.
William’s chosen profession was law, an astute choice that enabled him to contribute to J. Fleury’s Sons while also retaining his independence in Toronto. It appears that, as part of his law practice, William took on the role of legal and investment counsel for the family business.  After all, he did have an Aurora office located at the east entrance of the Foundry. In the years to come, William would travel extensively and likely had a hand in making sales abroad.
In August 1940, William came up to Aurora to visit his brother and stop by the Foundry, perhaps for the last time before Herbert died in September. He fulfilled his role as executor of Herbert’s estate.
William died in Toronto in 1946 and is buried in the Aurora Cemetery.

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J Fleury Estate

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The Next Generation :
Herbert Fleury

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