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The Next Generation :
William James Fleury

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The Next Generation :
The Fleury Mulock Partnership

A black and white photograph of man with white hair and a moustache standing in front of a large tree, he is holding a brimmed hat.

Herbert Fleury

The oldest child of Joseph Fleury and his first wife Sarah, Herbert was born on March 30, 1860, one year after his father started his blacksmith business in Aurora. Like father, like son. It was Herbert, who in the longer term realized Joseph’s vision of growth and prosperity for the Aurora Agricultural Works and the Town of Aurora.
Unlike his father, Herbert was not a blacksmith. He had the privilege of a public and private school education that included two years at Upper Canada College in Toronto. In his late teens, Herbert worked for two years at the Foundry before moving to Collingwood to attend college, which is where he was when he received news that father had died. From then on, Herbert accepted his father’s succession plan and returned to the Foundry where he grew into his ownership responsibilities under the tutelage of his father’s friend, and the de facto manager of the Foundry, Andrew Yule.
A black and white photograph of a woman in a high-collared black dress sitting against a painted backdrop.
Leila Meyers, c. 1880s
In 1884, Herbert married Leila Maud Meyers in Belleville’s Trinity Church. Three years later their daughter Marguerite was born and the family moved into Inglehurst. His wife and daughter spent many winters in Paris, where Marguerite was studying to become an opera singer, and Herbert would often travel abroad to spend time with them.
Like his father, Herbert under took a life of public and community service, becoming: a School Trustee, Chairman of the High School Board of Trustees, Councillor, Mayor, Reeve, President of the Horticulture Society and a Director of the Aurora Mechanics’ Institution – to name but a few.
A black and white portrait photograph of a young woman with a necklace looking to the left.
Marguerite Fleury, c. 1910s
Herbert led the increasingly “famous” Fleury Works in Aurora for almost sixty years, through heady times of expansion, the struggle of war and recovery, and the onslaught of the Depression. Herbert believed that the well-being of the company and the Town were inseparable.
Given his lifelong commitment to J. Fleury’s Sons, to Aurora and to the broader community, it was a devastating irony when, to preserve jobs in the late-1930s, Herbert gave up ownership of the business and merged the Foundry with the Bissell Company of Elora.
Herbert died in 1940, at the age of 80, and is buried at the Aurora Cemetery.

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The Next Generation :
William James Fleury

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The Fleury Mulock Partnership

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