Previous

Introduction

stapc 2col rev
Next

The Walter Amos Years

The first minister of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Aurora, was Dr. George Bruce, who was from Pitsligo, Scotland. The church started in 1871 when Bruce was chosen to be a missionary to Newmarket and Aurora. He officially became the minister in 1872 and stayed until 1876. He also was the first headmaster of St. Andrew’s College—before that college moved to Aurora. St. Andrew’s, Aurora, was not the first church in the area, as Col. William Graham had left land to the Church of Scotland back in 1813; this land was labeled “Presbyterian Glebe.” Before Aurora had its own church, Presbyterians in the area likely attended services of Rev. Henry Gordon—the minister of Whitchurch and King townships. Like most Presbyterian congregations, people would have been of Scottish descent.
The first minister of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Aurora, was Dr. George Bruce, who was from Pitsligo, Scotland. The church started in 1871 when Bruce was chosen to be a missionary to Newmarket and Aurora. He officially became the minister in 1872 and stayed until 1876. He also was the first headmaster of St. Andrew’s College—before that college moved to Aurora. St. Andrew’s, Aurora, was not the first church in the area, as Col. William Graham had left land to the Church of Scotland back in 1813; this land was labeled “Presbyterian Glebe.” Before Aurora had its own church, Presbyterians in the area likely attended services of Rev. Henry Gordon—the minister of Whitchurch and King townships. Like most Presbyterian congregations, people would have been of Scottish descent.
The first purpose-built church was constructed  in 1873 for $4,300 and seated up to 125 people. It was a red brick building with Gothic red, yellow, and blue stained glass windows and a rose window above the front doors. The church would add a drive shed, a wood shed, a kitchen, and a vestry. The church purchased two wood stoves in 1884 for $11.00 and $14.00; it is not clear how the building was heated before then.
blue para open

I remember dark pews in the old ivy-covered building, some carved with initials of youngsters for whom sermons had no appeal. Daytime lighting depended on the sun, and at the evening service it was helpful if you knew the hymns because the globes cast more light on the ceiling than on the hymn books.

- Helen Allen, 
daughter of St. Andrew’s minister Harry Allen
blue para close
line 3 blue sand 1

Previous

Introduction

stapc 2col rev
Next

The Walter Amos Years