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The Brick And Mortar Remain

 Across Aurora, barely shadows remain. The name of a street and a town park. A few names in the now digital Aurora phone book. In the old Trinity Anglican Church, a stained glass window. Across Yonge Street from Hillary House, a parking lot. At the corner of Wellington and Temperance Streets, buildings that stand on ancient foundations. The proud cenotaph. Houses in an old orchard.
On a street sign, stylized lines represent the rising sun and plow in the Aurora town crest as if the sands of time have worn away steel and wood.
For anyone who has lived in Aurora since World War II, it might be surprising that these scattered shadows were once the vibrant foundations of local pride, self-sufficiency, prosperity and community development of the Village (1863) and later, the Town of Aurora (1888).
Now, as Canada passes its sesquicentennial, it’s a good time to look back to the pioneer founders and employees of a manufacturing company, the Aurora Agricultural Works – later J. Fleury’s Estate and J. Fleury’s Sons – on which the 19th and early 20th century foundations of Aurora, a community with an innovative and manufacturing soul, were built.

“ The growth of the Town and the growth of the Fleury Works have gone on together. As if twins they have together grown and lived in harmony.”

AURORA BANNER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1909
A photograph of a sign for a town park made of two separate horizontal planks painted green, letters are painted yellow.
A photograph of streetlight-mounted banner advertising the Town of Aurora.
A photograph of a church parking lot bordered by tufts of tall grass.
Former location of Inglehurst
A photograph of a pair of crossed street signs made of green painted metal with white lettering.
A photograph of the crenellated top of a towering stone monument, a cylindrical column with a light atop protrudes from one corner.
The Aurora Cenotaph
Images courtesy of Stan Behal

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The Brick And Mortar Remain

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