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Death & Sucession

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The Next Generation :
W J Fleury

A black and white portrait photograph of an older man with a short, white beard.
“To Fleury’s employee and friend, Andrew Yule, fell tasks large and small: from registering Mr. Fleury’s death to keeping the foundry going.”
JACQUELINE STUART

Andrew Yule

It was Joseph’s ‘will and desire’ that the operation and management of the Aurora Agricultural Works be carried on by his executor, Andrew Yule, for a period of six years or for such shorter period as was required to satisfy and discharge the legacies and bequests to his family. After that, the management and assets of the business were to be transferred to Joseph’s two sons, Herbert Watson Fleury and William James Fleury.

 

Andrew Yule, in his role as executor, was to make all this possible – in today’s terms, he effectively became a combined chief financial officer and chief executive officer. He was expected to “devote the whole of his time and attention to the business.” In compensation, he received $1,000 a year.

 

As well as managing the Works, Andrew Yule decided to follow Joseph’s example of involvement in the affairs of the village. Mr. Yule stood for election in 1882, and although he was not successful, he was elected Reeve of Aurora in 1883 and every year thereafter through 1888. That year, Andrew Yule was also elected Warden of the county council with the largest majority that had ever been given for a warden in York County.

 

Andrew Yule continued to manage the Aurora Agricultural Works for the following six years – a period when the Works was called J. Fleury’s Estate – until Herbert and William Fleury took ownership in 1886. Indeed, he continued his role of manager of the Works and mentor to Herbert Fleury, in both the Works and as the latter was elected to public office in Aurora, well into the 1890s. In 1900, Andrew Yule left the company to assume a new role as the Customs Agent for the Town of Aurora.    

A black and white ink advertisement with the image of a ship inside a large horseshoe
A black and white ink advertisement featuring a lady holding a parasol while on a boat.
After the death of Joseph, the foundry was briefly referred to as J. Fleury’s Estate and marketing material referenced the original company name, Aurora Agricultural Works.
Image Courtesy of Aurora Historical Society

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Death & Sucession

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The Next Generation :
W J Fleury

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