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A black and white photo of an ornate mansion with dark roof and trim in its yard with a winding path to the entrance.
Image Courtesy of David Fleury
 Joseph Fleury, in the manner of other leading Victorian businessmen, including Hart Massey, Timothy Eaton, Robert Simpson, and Edgar Jarvis, asked the prestigious architectural firm Langley, Langley & Burke to design his own grand Victorian residence. Construction on “Inglehurst” – “hurst” meaning a wooded rise – began in the spring of 1876 on a 3-acre property at the corner of Yonge and Maple streets, a ten-minute walk north-east of the Fleury Works at the northern entrance to Aurora.
Inglehurst was surrounded by other elegant homes. Across the street stood Dr. Hillary’s playful and charming 1862 Gothic Revival house and medical office (preserved today as the Hillary House and home of the Aurora Historical Society). Just south of that, the elegant Italianate-style, “Horton Place”, home to Dr. Robinson, a dental surgeon, had just been completed in 1875.
Inglehurst was more than a family home. When Canada’s Prime Minister, Alexander Mackenzie, visited in 1877 this was only the beginning of a fascinating history; Inglehurst became a destination for distinguished guests and community events – a source of local pride. Unfortunately, Joseph lived only four years in Inglehurst.  His second wife, Sarah and their very young family continued living there after his death. In 1887, Herbert, his wife Leila, and their young daughter Marguerite made Inglehurst their home.
Under Herbert, the Fleury home evolved into a centre of social life that reflected his magnanimity and community-minded nature. For example, Herbert opened the grounds for public high teas during World War I to raise funds for the Girls’ Red Cross Auxiliary. These events attracted motorists going through town, raising additional funds for Aurora’s war effort.
For many years, Herbert was also a director of the Aurora Horticultural Society. His gardeners carefully tended the grounds at Inglehurst and reports of Herbert’s produce made their way into the local newspaper. In 1919, Herbert’s table bouquet, collection of perennials, lettuce, hickory and endive all won first prize at the summer flower show held by the Horticulture Society – in 1927, his delphiniums.
Herbert Fleury died at Inglehurst in 1940. Upon her return from Paris in 1946, Marguerite sold the house and, in 1980, it was demolished.
Its tall, striking front doors with frosted glass panels, and a marble mantlepiece, still reside in Aurora. They await new life as a memorial to their grand past, on display or in a building to come.
A black and white photograph of the interior of busily decorated room with an upright piano in the corner.
Inside of Inglehurst,
Image Courtesy of David Fleury
A black and white photograph of the interior of a busily decorated room, with a complex multi-seated chair in the corner.
Interior of Inglehurst,
Image Courtesy of David Fleury
A black and white photograph of two figures standing at the edge of a small garden at the end of a large lawn.
Inglehurst Gardens,
Image Courtesy of David Fleury
A black and white photograph of a grass tennis court on the lawn of stately mansion.
Tennis Court on the Inglehurst Grounds,
Image Courtesy of David Fleury
A black and white photograph of a man and woman each on a horse in front of the porch of a large house, a woman stands in front of the door.
Front Entrance of Inglehurst, January 13, 1906,
Aurora Museum & Archives (988.2.1)

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