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In 1937, J. Fleury’s Sons merged with the Bissell Company. The head office and primary manufacturing plant was based in Elora, Ontario, and the Aurora location operated as a branch office. The following year, a notice was posted in the local paper stating that J. Fleury’s Sons Limited was submitting an application to surrender their Charter, which would
formally dissolve the independent Fleury firm.
In April 1940, the decision was made to centralize all Fleury-Bissell operations in Elora and permanently leave Aurora, bringing with them 35 employees. By September the company had moved out of the corner of Temperance and Wellington Streets, and out of Aurora entirely.
The Fleury-Bissell years are remembered as turbulent. There was no serious attempt to secure any war contracts and the one very successful year (1948) was followed by the most disastrous in the company’s history with record breaking losses.
During the early 1950s Fleury-Bissell merged with Canadian Transformer Company in an attempt to diversify; however, workers on all levels struggled with the transformer business.
By 1954, the company defaulted on its loan payments and went into foreclosure. The property and its contents were sold to Marine Salvage for $55,000 who later sold it to Jack Lobel. On March 29, 1955 an auction of contents took place, which lasted three days.  At the auction, the London-Fraser Sales company purchased a large portion of the inventory. They went on to sell replacement parts for the Fleury-Bissell products as well as manufacture farm implements that used the Fleury-Bissell name until the late 1960s; although, both the Bissell and Fleury connection to the product was long gone.
The Aurora Museum & Archives would like to credit Stephen Thorning, and his column “Valuing our History” that was published in the Elora Sentinel. Mr. Thorning’s research of the Fleury-Bissell merger and the years that followed was central to our understanding of this chapter of the Fleury story.
A panoramic black and white photograph of a group of men and women sitting and standing outside an industrial building.
Employees of Fleury-Bissell Limited, Elora, Ontario 1948, Wellington County Museum & Archives, ph 9973
A black and white photograph of a brick factory building adjacent to a pond or river.
The T.E. Bissell Company c. 1920s, Wellington County Museum & Archives, ph 6372
A clipping from a newspaper notice about J. Fleury's Sons.
Aurora Banner, December 30, 1938

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